Audit

Listed here are details of current BSGAR audits and links to contribute to the audit.

Also listed are the results of previous BSGAR audits.

Current BSGAR Audit

National Audit of the Accuracy of Interpretation of Emergency Abdominal CT in Adult Patients Who Present with Non-Traumatic Abdominal Pain

The current BSGAR audit, National Audit of the Accuracy of Interpretation of Emergency Abdominal CT in Adult Patients Who Present with Non-Traumatic Abdominal Pain, has recently completed.  This was a highly successful collaborative audit between the Royal College of Radiologists and BSGAR.  Data are currently embargoed as they are under consideration for publication, but will be released once available.

Previous BSGAR Audits

National Colonic Imaging Survey

The results of this survey was presented at the BSGAR 2012 annual Meeting at the Hilton Hotel, Cardiff, 1st - 3rd Feb 2012.  Please click here to view presentation or scroll to the bottom of the page and click on thumbnail.

BSGAR Survey on GI Cancer MDT Working df

February 2009  


BSGAR Audit of Radiologically Inserted Gastrostomies

Accepted for publication in Clin Rad Dec 2011

Abstract:

Aims

To evaluate the variance in current UK clinical practice and clinical outcomes for direct percutaneous radiologically inserted gastrostomy (RIG).

Methods

A prospective UK multi-centre survey of RIG performed between October 2008 and August 2010 was performed through the British Society of GI and Abdominal Radiology(BSGAR).

Results

Data from 684 patients were provided by 45 radiologists working at 17 UK centres. 263 cases (40%) were performed with loop retained catheter, and 346 (53%) with balloon retained devices. 60% of all patients experienced pain in the first 24 hours but settled in the majority thereafter. Early complications, defined as occurring in the first 24 hours, included; minor bleeding (1%), wound infection (3%), peritonism (2%) and tube misplacement (1%). Late complications, defined as occurring between day 2 and day 30 post procedure, included; mild pain (30%), persisting peritonism (2%) and 30 day mortality of 1% (5/665). Pre-procedural antibiotics or anti-MRSA prophylaxis did not affect the rate of wound infection, peritonitis, post procedural pain, or mortality.

93% of cases were performed using gastropexy. Gastropexy decreased post procedural pain (p<0.001), but gastropexy-related complications occurred in 5% of patients. However, post-procedure pain increased with the number of gastropexy sutures used (p<0.001). The use of gastropexy did not affect the overall complication rate or mortality. Post-procedure pain increased significantly as tube size increased (p<0.001). The use of balloon retention feeding tubes was associated with more pain than the deployment of loop retention devices (p<0.001).

Conclusions

RIG is a relatively safe procedure with a mortality of 1%, with or without gastropexy. Pain is the commonest complication . The use of gastropexy, fixation dressing or skin sutures, smaller tube sizes and loop retention catheters significantly reduced the incidence of pain. There was a gastropexy-related complication rate in 5% of patients. Neither pre-procedural antibiotics nor anti-MRSA prophylaxis affected the rate of wound infection.
 

Download the RIG audit web post Jan 2012 df